You’ll Find Your Dream Home in Great-Value León, Nicaragua

León is a big, majestic city with almost 250,000 citizens, and more when the many universities are in session. Beautiful baroque architecture abounds, with many churches in different stages of refurbishment. Modern coffee shops, healthy food restaurants, international cuisine, theater, art, chic clothes shops, and more await you in León, where this grand city steeped in the past nevertheless presents a modern lifestyle.

A Colonial City Near the Beach for Less Than $1,500 a Month

Sitting at an outside table of El Sesteo restaurant at sunset with a watermelon mojito in hand, I watched the sky change into hues of purple and gold behind the domes of the Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption of Leon (the largest church in Central America). The central park square in front of me was bursting with life: families, groups of teenagers, elderly couples sitting on benches, and children playing games. The night was full of fireworks, music, and singing. A slight breeze took the edge off the heat and every now and then a tourist or two walked by.

Surfing, Hammocks, and Feeling Free in a Nicaraguan Beach Town

"Our days are so different from how they were in the States," says Jennings Wright. "Everything is more relaxing here and work often just feels like fun." After many months of travel, searching for a new and exciting place to live, Jennings (51) and her husband Chuck (56) chose Nicaragua for its low cost-of-living, natural beauty, and welcoming people.

A Profitable Hotel Business in Colonial Nicaragua

When Terry Leary decided to settle down, she called up her sister and organized a trip to the colonial city Granada, Nicaragua—a trip that changed their lives forever. "I was drawn to Granada by the people, culture, and lifestyle," says Terry. "Granada is brightly colored, vibrant, and alive and there is still the promise of more to come to this lovely city."

7 Nicaraguan Dishes You Have to Try

The best thing about your diet in Nicaragua is that you are eating healthier by default. GMO is not allowed and many farmers use homemade herbal pesticides because it’s much cheaper. It’s strange, because my friends and family in the U.S. and Australia go to great lengths to find “grass-fed and finished,” “free-range and uncaged,” and fruits and vegetables that haven’t been injected, painted, and waxed. No problem in Nicaragua. We don’t have that stuff. Everything here is how it used to be in the U.S.—fresh, unadulterated food.