Getting Your Residence in Uruguay

To apply for residence in Uruguay you must be in the country, this is perfect for those that try out the country and decide to stay. Uruguay’s Dirección Nacional de Migración (DNM, or Immigration) is the government office that deals with residence matters. The complete process for obtaining permanent residence takes 12 and 24 months in addition to the time it takes to obtain the necessary documents.

Retirement in Uruguay Is Unique

Uruguay is a nation of immigrants—which means that if you're looking to retire overseas, you'll fit right in. This unique country's citizens are descended from all corners of the world; about 90% of Uruguayans have ancestors from Western European, with the highest percentages from Spain, Italy, and France. And, because most Uruguayans are descendants of immigrants (and many know and can tell you their family's relocation story) newcomers are generally treated warmly.

The Trick to Buying Affordable Property in Punta del Este, Uruguay

Punta del Este, less than two hours from Uruguay’s elegant capital of Montevideo, has long been the most fashionable beach resort in South America. An apartment sold here a few years back for $7.2 million… but believe it or not, you can still find a nice condo in a coveted Punta del Este neighborhood for less than $150,000. There’s a secret to buying affordably here. And it’s simple.

Seven Things to do in Montevideo, Uruguay

Montevideo, Uruguay's capital city, has a culture that many North American expats find comfortable. It's a place where the traditional and the modern weave together. For example, Montevideo has a prosperous economy, but people still take time for one another. It has new gleaming malls, but it is also teeming with small family-owned shops. Each child in the country receives a free laptop computer, but time with family is still cherished above all else.

The Best Things in Life Are Still Free in Montevideo, Uruguay

Somehow, in my adult life, I developed the belief that I needed money to have a good time. However, living in Montevideo reminds me that’s just not so. Here, there are so many public spaces, celebrations, and ways to socialize... all for little or no money. In fact, the idea that the finer things in life should be available to all is so important to Uruguayans that they dedicate a whole weekend to it every spring.