No-Stress or Strife: Life’s Easier in Uruguay

When I first came to Uruguay in 2006, I knew I'd found the place I wanted to live—just six months later, I'd changed my life around and moved to Uruguay. So what prompted such a big change? For starters, the culture of Uruguay is something special—the perfect blend of warmth and respect. Here, people are more important than schedules. Friends and coworkers greet each other with a kiss on the cheek. Neighbors take an interest in each other, and extended families get together on Sundays.

How to Make a Home in Bolivia with Just A Little Spanish

It's said “a little knowledge is a dangerous thing”…but that’s definitely not the case when it comes to learning Spanish. On the contrary, knowing just a little Spanish is often enough to reach your goal of starting a new life in a Spanish-speaking country. With just a little knowledge of the language, you can express and understand many very basic exchanges. Then, you just keep improving little by little…day by day. You’d be amazed how it can enrich your life. Take getting around in a taxi as an example:

Video: Where to Buy Real Estate in Uruguay–Three Areas to Consider

Uruguay is the most economically, politically, and socially stable country in the region. The property registration system is among the best in Latin America. And you don't need to become a resident or get a local tax ID number to buy, own, or sell real estate in Uruguay. Even though real estate values have climbed in recent years, with a little research it's still possible to buy property in the most popular areas of the country for a very reasonable price.

Santiago, Chile: A Cosmopolitan Latin American City

Cosmopolitan, indeed—as well as comfortable and convenient. In Santiago you’ll find modern skyscrapers, including the tallest building in Latin America. There’s a sleek and efficient subway system. Popular cuisine from around the world is paired with fine Chilean wines in the city’s many upscale restaurants. And opera, ballet, Broadway hits, great museums, and dozens of galleries abound.

A New Income in Uruguay Transformed This Single Mom’s Life

When people ask me what's so good about Uruguay, I often talk about the various income opportunities, the natural beauty of the land, or the ability to live a simpler and less complicated life. Just a while ago, I was trading notes about life in Uruguay with Karen Michele—a single mother from the U.S. who moved to Punta del Este, Uruguay with her 12-year-old daughter, Etanne.

Retirement in Uruguay Is Unique

Uruguay is a nation of immigrants—which means that if you're looking to retire overseas, you'll fit right in. This unique country's citizens are descended from all corners of the world; about 90% of Uruguayans have ancestors from Western European, with the highest percentages from Spain, Italy, and France. And, because most Uruguayans are descendants of immigrants (and many know and can tell you their family's relocation story) newcomers are generally treated warmly.

An Expat’s Worst Spanish Mistake—It Was All Part of the Process

John Brenner, a Minnesotan in his late 50s, was traveling in South America looking for a new place to live. The next leg of his trip was from Bogotá, Colombia to Lima, Peru. He was joined by three others, also Lima bound, whom he had met in the Bogotá hostel where he stayed. After an all-night bus ride they reached Ecuador's border, where they crossed on foot. Once in Ecuador the four had a stroke of luck.

Uruguayan Ranch and Beach Life

Each morning Jerry Bruner wakes up on his farm in Uruguay. He checks in on his animals…Jack the Labrador…Carbon the tiger-stripe cat…the chickens…the geese…and half-a-dozen beef cattle who roam a fenced-off, green pasture. The farm covers 27 acres of greenery and is a world away from Jerry’s native Nevada. What Jerry loves most about Uruguay Read more...: Uruguayan Ranch and Beach Life