“How I Make a Living in a Small Town in Brazil”

I worked in corporate America for more than 20 years. I made good money. Outwardly, I led a successful life. But I sacrificed a lot. Frequent travel made maintaining relationships difficult. My workload seemed to grow inexorably. Every phone call, voicemail, and e-mail seemed to bring yet another problem I needed to resolve. I grew to dread beginning my work day.

Prosperity, Beauty and Beaches in Florianopolis, Brazil

Home to 420,000 people, Florianopolis is often referred to by its residents as "the other Brazil." For one thing, there is the evident prosperity, from brand-name jeans to the latest-model cars. The streets and sidewalks are clean. Unemployment is low, as is the crime rate. There are parks and pedestrian plazas. And the city is large enough to offer most services that you might need, without the problems of a bigger metropolis.

Retired in Our 40s and Homesteading in Belize

Caprice Parkes and Joe Singh's rustic lifestyle is very different to the life they left behind...and they love it. The couple lives in Chan Chen Village, in Belize's northern Corozal District, abutting Mexico. Young "retirees" at only 43 and 45, Caprice and Joe actively work a 22-acre homestead, and are largely self-sufficient. "We grow our own greens, spinach, lettuces, okra, beans of different sorts, herbs, cassava, sweet potato, onions, and fruit trees," says Caprice. "Joe goes fishing and hunting with the locals from our village. We can pretty much eat for free most days. We raise chickens and turkeys and will shortly start raising pigs."

Postcard from the Edge (of Brazil)

At my sidewalk table, I smile to myself, and hoist my glass for another sip. Full-bodied German beer, a tidy Mayberry-esque town square across the street…and gauchos in full regalia passing by. Sometimes it’s still hard to believe I’m in Brazil And in fact, the locals proudly refer to their little slice of heaven as Outro Brazil: “Another Brazil.” Stretching east to west across Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil’s southernmost state, the Serra Gaucha (“Cowboy Highlands”) is a delightful little enclave reminiscent of the rolling hills of the Great Smoky Mountains of my native North Carolina.

“A Lifestyle We Could Never Afford in the U.S.”

"Florida was nice but boring," Maryann Risley says of her retirement to Orlando with husband, Steve. After all, "you can only visit Disney World so many times." The couple craved some excitement and some new adventure, so they began to research retirement abroad. "I found IL magazine and started to read about the benefits of retiring in Panama," Maryann says.

Replace Rush Hour With Naps and Fresh Coconuts in Corozal, Belize

Last year Kenneth Fung made his long-held dream of a snowbird's life a reality. An accountant and project manager from Calgary, Canada, Kenneth first visited Belize in 2010. He was first drawn by Belize's natural beauty. The country is a haven for those seeking tranquility and nature, a place where breezes make for natural air conditioning, and you're lulled to sleep by waves lapping on the shore after a day of scuba diving and learning to husk coconuts.

Small-Town USA in Brazil’s Wine Country

The Serra Gaúcha lies in the northeast part of Brazil’s southernmost state, Rio Grande do Sul, which borders Argentina and Uruguay. It’s far enough south (29 degrees) and high enough (about 2,800 feet) to have four true seasons. Each winter the thermometer drops to freezing a few days. There is light snow some years. The Serra Gaúcha has three regions: the eastern Gaúcha region, which is largely farmland and villages; the central, German-influenced region; and the Italian region in the west, which—no surprise—is home of the state’s wine industry. Vineyards and wineries cluster around the town of Bento Gonçalves.

The 3 Best Towns Near Rio, Brazil

“Rio de Janeiro.” The name alone conjures up images of broad beaches populated by impossibly beautiful people. But while everyone has heard of Rio, far fewer know that “The Marvelous City” lies in a state of the same name. Rio de Janeiro state, though small in size, is geographically quite diverse. Mountains parallel the coastline, sometimes veering down into the sea. Broad swaths of the original mata Atlântica (Atlantic forest)—one of the most biodiverse areas in the world—still blanket the hillsides. Scores of lakes and lagoons lie within sight of the shimmering South Atlantic. Majestic beaches stretch literally for miles; others lie sheltered in secluded coves, accessible only by boat. Tantalizing palm-studded islands, most uninhabited, await the more adventurous.