If just planning on visiting Aruba, U.S. citizens do not need a visa for stays of up to 30 days.If looking to stay a little longer, U.S. and Canadian citizens can request an extension of this visa to 180 days if they have property in Aruba or have a declaration of guarantee from a resident of Aruba who will act as guarantor for and be liable for any costs incurred during their stay.

All tourists who apply for an extension of their stay beyond 30 days are required to have travel insurance (medical and liability) valid for the duration of the extended stay.

If you want to live and work in Aruba, you must have a valid residence permit from the Directorate of Alien Integration,Policy and Admission (DIMAS). Find more information at: www.dimasaruba.aw

*Prices as of 2013

From the Archives of Caribbean

Do You Have the Right to a Second Passport?

Do You Have the Right to a Second Passport?

Daily Postcard
By |
March 23, 2017

You may not have considered it, but you may have a right to become a citizen of more than one country—and doing so could change your life for the better. Under U.S. law, upheld by several U.S. Supreme Court decisions, “dual citizenship” (holding a second citizenship) does not jeopardize U.S. citizenship.

Retirees Sail the Caribbean for 8 Years On a $1,000-Per-Month Budget

Retirees Sail the Caribbean for 8 Years On a $1,000-Per-Month Budget

Gary and Julie discovered that learning how to sail, buying a sailboat, and cruising from island to island isn’t as difficult – or expensive - as they once believed. In fact, they wound up spending eight full years sailing the Caribbean on their own boat, without any major problems, and spent only $1,000 a month to do it.