Uruguay Fast Facts

Uruguay

Population: 3,324,460 (July 2013 est.)

Capital City: Montevideo

Climate: Warm temperate; freezing temperatures almost unknown

Time Zone: GMT-3

Language: Spanish (official)

Country Code: 598

Coastline: 660 km

Uruguay: A Latin American Safe Haven

Are you looking for a true safe haven in Latin America?

If so, you need to know about Uruguay—a politically, economically, and socially stable country with a mild climate free of earthquakes and hurricanes.

Uruguay is below the tropical zone and has four seasons. The average summer high temperature is 82 degrees F, cooling down to 63 F at night. The average winter high temperature is 57 degrees F, cooling down to 43 F at night. Because Uruguay is in the Southern Hemisphere with opposite seasons, summer is in December, January, and February.

Besides mild weather, Uruguay has a warm social climate. You’ll find less economic disparity here than anyplace else in Latin America. Uruguayan culture is noted for tolerance and inclusiveness. And expats who are respectful of Uruguay’s culture and make an effort to learn some basic Spanish report feeling comfortable and accepted here.

Uruguay is also among the top countries in the region when it comes to infrastructure. Here, you’ll find the best overall road system, the most reliable electrical grid, and one of the fastest overall internet speeds in Latin America. You’ll also find quality medical care, safe drinking water, and good public transportation.

Even though Uruguay is a small country, it offers a variety of lifestyle options. Choose among places like Montevideo, the capital city with an active cultural scene; Punta del Este, the continent’s most sophisticated beach resort; La Paloma, a small beach town on the Atlantic coast; or a small farm or rural town in Uruguay’s countryside.

But what about Uruguay’s solvency? The country of Uruguay has investment-grade sovereign bonds. The locally-owned banks are well capitalized and safe. In 2009, when most of the world’s economy was suffering from the global recession, Uruguay posted an economic gain. There were no failed banks, and the rate of nonperforming loans throughout the country was just 1%.

Uruguay is a popular place to invest in real estate. That’s because foreigners can buy, own, and sell property with the same rights and protections as a Uruguayan citizen. Uruguay’s government welcomes foreign investment by individuals, the system for registering property ownership is solid, and property rights are enforced.

Uruguay is a nice place to spend time. It’s a small food producing country, which offers a variety of pleasant lifestyle options that is out of the way of world conflict.

From the Archives of Uruguay Articles

This Beach Province Is Set to Explode in Value

This Beach Province Is Set to Explode in Value

Beach Living
By |
April 21, 2015

Long, unspoiled beaches...a new infrastructure project that will open up access to an undeveloped but seriously attractive region...and the chance to watch a real estate investment grow rapidly in value: just some of the reasons you need to be looking at Uruguay's Rocha region. Little Uruguay is a small, open economy—and one of the best places to consider buying real estate in the world right now.

No-Stress or Strife: Life’s Easier in Uruguay

No-Stress or Strife: Life’s Easier in Uruguay

Countries
By |
April 20, 2015

When I first came to Uruguay in 2006, I knew I'd found the place I wanted to live—just six months later, I'd changed my life around and moved to Uruguay. So what prompted such a big change? For starters, the culture of Uruguay is something special—the perfect blend of warmth and respect. Here, people are more important than schedules. Friends and coworkers greet each other with a kiss on the cheek. Neighbors take an interest in each other, and extended families get together on Sundays.

When You’re Spoiled for Choices Overseas, How Do You Choose?

When You’re Spoiled for Choices Overseas, How Do You Choose?

"We're looking at retirement options," she wrote, "and I've appreciated your insights, particularly on Ecuador, Mexico, Panama, and Uruguay. I know that seems like a lot of countries, so I'm hoping you can help us narrow it down. We plan to take a trip to at least two of these this year; one country at a time. Which country would you suggest we visit first? And can you please suggest some travel itineraries?"

Ten Tips for Renting a Home Overseas

Ten Tips for Renting a Home Overseas

Expat-Advice
By |
April 3, 2014

When moving abroad, renting a place to stay is an attractive option that offers a lot of advantages, whether you're headed to Costa Rica, Malaysia, France, Mexico, Ecuador, Ireland...or any country. If you plan to buy or build a home eventually, renting allows you to investigate a region and/or community...or several...before you put down roots. You don't want to be stuck in a neighborhood, region, or home you don't like.

An Expat’s Worst Spanish Mistake—It Was All Part of the Process

An Expat’s Worst Spanish Mistake—It Was All Part of the Process

Expat-Advice
By |
January 24, 2014

John Brenner, a Minnesotan in his late 50s, was traveling in South America looking for a new place to live. The next leg of his trip was from Bogotá, Colombia to Lima, Peru. He was joined by three others, also Lima bound, whom he had met in the Bogotá hostel where he stayed. After an all-night bus ride they reached Ecuador's border, where they crossed on foot. Once in Ecuador the four had a stroke of luck.

Five Places to Get Affordable Health Care Overseas

Five Places to Get Affordable Health Care Overseas

Countries
By |
November 29, 2013

In the following five countries you will pay less for health care than you do at home. And the quality is at least as good…in fact, many expats say it’s better. Affordable health care isn’t the only reason to move overseas—but it makes the move more attractive. You can get great quality health care for less abroad, lowering your monthly expenses. Panama offers excellent quality health care and modern hospitals in Panama City and other large towns or cities...