Uruguay Fast Facts

Uruguay

Population: 3,324,460 (July 2013 est.)

Capital City: Montevideo

Climate: Warm temperate; freezing temperatures almost unknown

Time Zone: GMT-3

Language: Spanish (official)

Country Code: 598

Coastline: 660 km

Uruguay: A Latin American Safe Haven

Are you looking for a true safe haven in Latin America?

If so, you need to know about Uruguay—a politically, economically, and socially stable country with a mild climate free of earthquakes and hurricanes.

Uruguay is below the tropical zone and has four seasons. The average summer high temperature is 82 degrees F, cooling down to 63 F at night. The average winter high temperature is 57 degrees F, cooling down to 43 F at night. Because Uruguay is in the Southern Hemisphere with opposite seasons, summer is in December, January, and February.

Besides mild weather, Uruguay has a warm social climate. You’ll find less economic disparity here than anyplace else in Latin America. Uruguayan culture is noted for tolerance and inclusiveness. And expats who are respectful of Uruguay’s culture and make an effort to learn some basic Spanish report feeling comfortable and accepted here.

Uruguay is also among the top countries in the region when it comes to infrastructure. Here, you’ll find the best overall road system, the most reliable electrical grid, and one of the fastest overall internet speeds in Latin America. You’ll also find quality medical care, safe drinking water, and good public transportation.

Even though Uruguay is a small country, it offers a variety of lifestyle options. Choose among places like Montevideo, the capital city with an active cultural scene; Punta del Este, the continent’s most sophisticated beach resort; La Paloma, a small beach town on the Atlantic coast; or a small farm or rural town in Uruguay’s countryside.

But what about Uruguay’s solvency? The country of Uruguay has investment-grade sovereign bonds. The locally-owned banks are well capitalized and safe. In 2009, when most of the world’s economy was suffering from the global recession, Uruguay posted an economic gain. There were no failed banks, and the rate of nonperforming loans throughout the country was just 1%.

Uruguay is a popular place to invest in real estate. That’s because foreigners can buy, own, and sell property with the same rights and protections as a Uruguayan citizen. Uruguay’s government welcomes foreign investment by individuals, the system for registering property ownership is solid, and property rights are enforced.

Uruguay is a nice place to spend time. It’s a small food producing country, which offers a variety of pleasant lifestyle options that is out of the way of world conflict.

From the Archives of Uruguay Articles

The Little-known Country You Should Move to…

The Little-known Country You Should Move to…

Countries
By |
July 9, 2012

If you don't know much about what a great country Uruguay is...here's a quick primer: The infrastructure is excellent...and the health care is affordable (figure 10% what you pay in the U.S. for the same quality care, or better). The cultural norms in Uruguay are what you'd expect coming from Europe or North America.

Privacy and Freedom in Uruguay

Privacy and Freedom in Uruguay

Countries
By |
June 25, 2012

Plenty of U.S. expats live in Uruguay. I can see why. The laws and the government welcome foreigners as immediate residents and citizenship can follow after three to five years. The seven licensed banks welcome Americans as clients, hold more than half of their cash in dollars or euros, pay more interest than U.S. banks and enforce strict financial privacy that only a court can waive.

Uruguay: A Great Retirement Haven

Uruguay: A Great Retirement Haven

Countries
By |
June 5, 2012

Knowing what I know now, it’s possible that Uruguay may be the best retirement destination you could treat yourself to. Not the cheapest…but the best. (And still at about half the cost of living in North America these days.) Uruguay offers the very best of Latin America and Europe all rolled up into one surprisingly appealing package. Unlike much of Latin America, it comes with a stable government...

Move to Uruguay for the Best Quality of Life in Latin America

Move to Uruguay for the Best Quality of Life in Latin America

Countries
By |
May 1, 2012

As in European cities or neighborhoods of Manhattan or Chicago, whatever I need or want can be had within these 10 square blocks of Montevideo. I was just getting started on my expedition to Uruguay’s coastal cities and towns, but already I could understand why so many expats living in this country say it offers the best quality of life in Latin America.

Artboard 1Artboard 14Artboard 1Artboard 1down-arrowdown-arrowArtboard 1facebook-roundfacebook-squareArtboard 12Artboard 1googleplus-roundgoogle-squareheadphoneshealthcarehousehouseArtboard 2Artboard 1Artboard 1locksearch-mag3Artboard 1Artboard 15Artboard 1next-largenextArtboard 1plusprev-largeprevread-more-arrowread-more-arrowsearch-magSlider Arrowto-toptwitter-roundtwitter-squareyoutube-roundyoutube-square