From the Archives of Real Estate

“We Discovered There’s No Borders to Retirement”

“We Discovered There’s No Borders to Retirement”

"We're so happy to be here, every day is just a great day," Micki Westhorp says. "We can't imagine being retired anywhere else and having this kind of quality of life." Micki, 71, and her partner, Jaci Norwood, 62, moved from Dallas, Texas, to Cuenca, Ecuador, with the intention of buying a home and starting their retirement.

The Best Colonial City Buy in Latin America?

The Best Colonial City Buy in Latin America?

Mine was in Mexico, in a small city nestled in the hills of the Central Highlands. I had dreamt of Latin America's colonial towns, cobbled lanes, and shaded parks ever since first encountering the literature from that part of the world. The movies I saw confirmed it...There was magic and romance in those places and I wanted in.

Video: How I Boosted a Mexican Condo’s Occupancy Rate By 72% In One Month

Video: How I Boosted a Mexican Condo’s Occupancy Rate By 72% In One Month

Last year I was fortunate to spend some time in one of my favorite places—Tulum, Mexico. I was carrying out an interior design project for two condos that belonged to a client. When the job was finished, I handed them both over to the local vacation rental management company, who promised a 32% to 34% occupancy rate. Not a stellar rate, but not terrible for the first few years of business.

Making an Overseas Dream a Reality in Costa Rica’s Jungle

Making an Overseas Dream a Reality in Costa Rica’s Jungle

While loving life in Boise, Idaho with friends and family close by, Scott and Nicky Freymond noticed a sense of restlessness a couple years back during the long, harsh winters. They started to research options for a sunnier second home that would ultimately give them the best of both worlds.

Beach Condos From $73,000 On Costa Rica’s Pacific Coast

Beach Condos From $73,000 On Costa Rica’s Pacific Coast

The central Pacific beach town of Jacó in Costa Rica was long known primarily as a destination for sport fisherman, surfers, and backpackers. And Ticos—as Costa Ricans call themselves—flocked there around Christmas and Easter because it's the closest major beach to San José, the capital.