In Pictures: The Best of Mediterranean Malta

The Mediterranean Sea, a warm and sunny climate, a peaceful lifestyle waiting to be lived…where are we talking about?

The answer might surprise you…it’s Malta.

Anchored almost in the center of the Mediterranean Sea, 60 miles from the Italian island of Sicily, Malta isn’t a mainstream destination for North American tourists.

For discerning travelers with a love of culture, history, and excellent weather, that’s good news. It’s a treat to come across places that haven’t had all the charm and identity crushed out of them by the hoards of visitors who have landed on their shores.

The big question is, what can this island offer you as a prospective resident? Well, how about a tranquil way of life and virtually non-existent crime? Year-round Mediterranean sunshine?The opportunity to benefit from a considerable reduction in your tax burden?

These are just some of the advantages to living in the Republic of Malta. What’s more, you will not have to learn a foreign language. Everybody on the islands speaks English as a second language.

See the slideshow below to discover the best of Mediterranean Malta.

If you’re looking for urban living in Malta, with access to shops, theaters, restaurants—and all of these in a physically beautiful city—there’s nothing that can touch Valletta.  UNESCO declared Valletta a World Heritage site in 1980, and since then facades and some buildings have been beautifully restored. Even more renovations and improvements in infrastructure have been stepped up for when Valetta takes over as European capital of culture in 2018.Sliema is one of Malta’s busiest shopping areas—there’s even a mall. But walk just a short distance from the main streets and you find quiet residential neighborhoods. Neo-classical buildings, with lovely windows at the upper stories, provide comfortable living space.A seaside promenade runs along Sliema’s waterfront and is a popular spot for a late-afternoon stroll. Facing this pretty waterfront is a string a busy restaurants, shops, and bars, with outdoor tables for enjoying the view.This is the largest of the Three Cities. Cospicua is known for its celebration of Good Friday, which began in the 18th century and is a popular tourist attraction. A statue of the Resurrection of Jesus is traditionally carried through the city's streets to symbolize Jesus's triumph over death. Smaller statues are also exhibited in the city.A classic “get-away-from-it-all” destination, Gozo enjoys a slower pace of life. The island’s largest city, Victoria (population about 6,500), is laidback, with elderly locals whiling away the afternoon on shady park benches. Gozo’s beach towns get busy during the high summer season but the island’s interior, with its vineyards, farm houses, and rugged landscape, seem to belong to an earlier time.The walled city of Mdina is Malta’s former capital. Mdina is known as “the Silent City,” and silent it is, with numerous signs asking tourists to keep down noise and respect the privacy of Mdina’s 300 residents. Mdina is beautifully preserved, with soaring facades, romantic windowed balconies and narrow, cobblestone lanes.
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A classic “get-away-from-it-all” destination, Gozo enjoys a slower pace of life. The island’s largest city, Victoria (population about 6,500), is laidback, with elderly locals whiling away the afternoon on shady park benches. Gozo’s beach towns get busy during the high summer season but the island’s interior, with its vineyards, farm houses, and rugged landscape, seem to belong to an earlier time.

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